Follow-up on Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ scheme in Dennistoun

Glasgow City Council (GCC) recently responded to the most recent query from Dennistoun Community Council (DCC) in an ongoing dialogue regarding the Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ scheme in Dennistoun.

Prior related posts on this can be viewed here, here, and here. Questions below are those asked by DCC on 11th May 2021 as per the third of those linked pages. Answers are those provided by GCC on 8th June 2021.

This latest GCC response was discussed by commnunity councillors at the DCC ordinary meeting held on 8th June, with an acknowledgement that most issues raised in response to resident enquiries have now been answered one way or another. There may be merit in seeking technical clarification on a couple of matters but it was agreed that the most positive action now would be that the DCC priority is to looking ahead to future schemes upcoming in our area.

Notably, this includes the proposed Liveable Neighbourhoods consultation, the resumption of the Restricted Parking Zone scheme. See items 2 and 7 respectively on the agenda for the 08 June 2021 Environment, Sustainability and Carbon Reduction City Policy committee meeting for further details of these. The former identifies the Dennistoun, Riddrie & Carntyne area as one of four initial ’20 Minute Neighborhoods’, and that there will be “full consultation and engagement with the local communities and key stakeholders”, to be carried out by an external consultant. The RPZ is “expected to be complete by 2023”, with an acknowledgement that the methodology and evidence base used thus far leaves room for improvement (see previous DCC information from 2019 here and here).

DCC is also involved in an ongoing process of dialogue with MSPs and Councillors to establish progress on implementation of the pavement parking legslation (not likely to come into force until 2023). DCC is additionally contributing to the City Centre Strategy workshops and consultation processes underway for the Learning Quarter and Merchant City districts which either overlap or tie in with the DCC area.

In the meantime, feedback on the Spaces for People scheme in Dennistoun can be submitted via the feedback form via the GCC Dennistoun Spaces for People webpage. More broadly, a full online Spaces for People consultation survey is open, available via glasgow.gov.uk/spacesforpeople (end date 20th June 2021), seeking views on the infrastructure introduced in response to Covid to provide additional public space for walking, wheeling and cycling.

With that noted, here is the follow-up, with DCC (May 2021) questions in black; GCC (June 2021) responses in blue.

Q: Why did the initial design and implementation leave multiple through routes open in both directions between Duke Street and Alexandra Parade?

A: At the outset it is important to understand the aims and limitations of the Spaces for People grant funding and how this impacted on the projects promoted via this route. The Spaces for People project’s primary function was to create additional space for people to socially distance and to encourage active travel as part of the response to the Covid 19 pandemic. Grant funding was specifically linked to those uses and was to be temporary in nature. Due to the need to implement such schemes faster than usual, temporary traffic regulation orders (TTRO) were permitted, but this type of order does not provide for public consultation. Under these circumstances, the measures implemented were limited to the permitted use and should be expected to be simpler and less robust than a permanent project due to their temporary nature. It was therefore not possible to implement either the range or complexity of measures which we might expect under a planned low traffic neighbourhood project. Officers tried to maximise the benefit to the area whilst staying within these limits and as in other SfP projects, were prepared to be flexible and make amendments or remove, where these measures were not successful.

Mindful of the lack of consultation in the TTRO process, we feel it is therefore better to look at a future, more permanent set of measures, in collaboration with the local community where a full consultation is able to be conducted.

Q: Why were the no-entry points on Criagpark and Armadale Street removed outright so soon after installation, with virtually no monitoring period during which the full scheme was in place, and without any attempt at improvement?

A: Following observation of the scheme at Dennistoun in practice, and in consideration of community feedback, the decision was taken to remove some of the measures per the original scheme design, whilst retaining and maintaining those which most broadly meet the aim of creating extra space for physical distancing. The other issue we encountered was vandalism of the planters, some were pushed over or moved, as happened in other areas of the country.

Moving forward we will invite the community council to discuss the possibility of more robust, permanent measures to facilitate a reduction in traffic.

Q: Why were improved no-entry points (with signs on both sides of the carriageway and no-entry road markings) not put in place?

A: The desire of traffic to leave the area directly to Duke Street or Alexandra Parade was not being achieved. High levels of vandalism were experienced during the project which meant that we could not maintain the temporary barriers and a more robust and permanent solution will be needed to deter this behaviour. This was not achievable under the limitations of the Spaces for People project. Looking to the future, I am happy to take this discussion forward with the community council.

Q: Has the additional risk created by the extended route to bypass south Armadale Street been balanced against the alleged risk of the previously proposed contraflow cycling? Should the evident increased enforcement burden at south Armadale Street be used as justification for removing the new configuration at this location?

A: As previously discussed, the Spaces for People measures are temporary in nature and will be subject to a monitoring and review process. Safety of all users is our priority and the contraflow cycling measures were removed in response to feedback from Police Scotland which highlighted the risk of collision in the narrow residential roads. It was felt that removing residents parking without prior public consultation in this densely populated residential area would not be within the spirit of Spaces for People and therefore the only other option was to remove these temporary measures early. The online questionnaire will be available on the Spaces for People website until 20th June for everyone to give their feedback on the SfP measures.

Looking forward, lessons can be learned from the SfP measures and I can assure you that this is only the start of a bigger conversation within the community to look at ways we can work together to achieve the positive outcomes we all hoped for.

Q: Is the road marking layout at the crossroads of Armadale Street and Roslea Drive confirmed as being fully compliant with legislation, or has approval for a deviation been given? Who has priority when two or more vehicles simultaneously approach this crossroads from the south/west/east?

A: I can advise that priority here is given to the main road which the two side roads are joining (Armadale Street (southbound)). As this is a busy junction within a residential area drivers should take extra caution.

Q: Does north Armadale Street outside Alexandra Parade primary school still have a contraflow cycle lane? If yes, why remove the road markings? If no, why have the temporary ‘no left/right turn except cycles’ signs been left in place?

A: I can advise that contra flow cycling has been removed from all roads within this scheme. If there is any signage which still requires removing, arrangements will be made to have these removed as soon as possible.

Comment: Works outstanding and forseeable delays.

A: I can advise that any permanent reinstatements required will be completed at the earliest opportunity using like for like materials.

The situation throughout the past year has been one of constant change with restrictions changing weekly, contractors furloughed for many months and a ripple effect throughout the whole supply chain as global conditions and demand has fluctuated. Officers have coped with these conditions, which nobody could have predicted, to the best of their ability and have implemented a large number of Spaces for People measures in a fraction of the time it would normally take to bring these projects to fruition.

That said, I can advise that your comments have been noted, and we will take on board the lessons we have learned to date, particularly about communication, and work towards identifying potential improvements to the way any future schemes are implemented.

Q: What are the safety concerns, specifically, in relation to the removal of pedestrian barrier outside Alexandra Parade primary school? Why has it not been deemed practicable to provide safe pedestrian space outside of Alexandra Parade primary school without the need for a retained pedestrian barrier running down the middle of it? Is there scope for a temporary build-out (as shown on the issued drawings) to be tried out at the Whitehill Street/Duke Street junction as part of this “agile” and “readily adjusted scheme”?

A: I can advise that the pedestrian safety barrier outside of Alexandra Parade Primary School is being retained at present as this is a protective device at the entrance / exit to the school. The LTN is a temporary measure, therefore we wouldn’t remove this permanent barrier.

I can advise that no build-out feature was proposed for the Whitehill Street / Duke Street junction.

The feature shown on the plan at this junction was not a build out but showed the new kerb layout from a previous footway widening scheme. Please accept my apologies for this oversight.

Q: Parking restrictions are, without question, not being effectively enforced in Dennistoun – why is that?

A: I would advise that, due to the current public health restrictions in place, our enforcement capabilities have been reduced, however I can confirm that our enforcement team shall attend this area as soon as possible and if any vehicles are seen to be parking in contravention of the restrictions they will carry out enforcement.

Q: What is the method of monitoring of this scheme, and will any quantitative data be published?

A: I can advise that various datasets will be used as part of the monitoring / review process such as feedback from the local community, feedback from emergency service providers, refuse collection impacts, feedback from local ward members and site observations from all immediately affected plus surrounding roads. An independent consultant has been engaged to review and assess all SfP measures.

I can further advise that feedback on the Spaces for People scheme at Dennistoun can be submitted via the Dennistoun Spaces for People webpage.

Q: If a permanent scheme to achieve all the stated Council aims is to be completed before the 18 month period for the current temporary scheme ends, it seems reasonable to suggest that a timeline or programme detailing various milestones will have already been identified such that a design can be developed for Dennistoun, including consultation and engagement with the community at a level beyond the basic statutory process for a permanent Traffic Regulation Order – is that the case?

A: I can advise that we will continue to assess and monitor the impacts of the LTN while also listening to feedback from the local community during the trial period.

Feedback on the Spaces for People scheme at Dennistoun can be submitted via the Dennistoun Spaces for People webpage.

I can confirm that the Council will take the appropriate steps to engage and listen to community feedback, in accordance with the relevant statutory process, before making any decisions on removing or making the scheme permanent, including any appropriate modifications.

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Meeting Minutes: 9th March 2021, and Meeting Notes: 13th April 2021

Approved minutes of the Dennistoun Community Council ordinary meeting held on Tuesday 9th March and notes from the planning meeting held on 13th April 2020 are now available at dennistouncc.org.uk/minutes.

Dates and details of future meetings can be found at dennistouncc.org.uk/dates. The next ordinary meeting will take place on Tuesday 8th June 2021, from 7:00pm online, via Zoom.

To get DCC updates delivered to your inbox, enter your email address into the box in the menu section of this site and click Subscribe Now! (To the left of the screen in desktop view, or via the menu button at the top of the screen in mobile view). Easy to unsubscribe from at any time.

Update on Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ scheme in Dennistoun

An update on the Dennistoun Community Council (DCC) enquiry sent on 15th March 2021 regarding the Spaces for People (SfP) ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ scheme in Dennistoun, asking ten questions arising.

Glasgow City Council responded on 12th April 2021. That response was discussed at the DCC planning meeting held on 13th April 2021.

DCC then submitted comments and questions in return, to GCC, on 11th May 2021. It was copied to Dennistoun Ward Councillors Allan Casey, Kim Long and Elaine McDougall; Cllr Anna Richardson (City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction); and Sustrans Scotland.

Original DCC (March 2021) questions in black; GCC (April 2021) responses in blue; latest DCC (May 2021) comments and questions in green.

DCC Q1: Why have multiple through routes been left open in both directions between Duke Street and Alexandra Parade?

GCC: Following observation of the scheme at Dennistoun in practice, and in consideration of community feedback, we have taken the decision to remove some of the measures per the original scheme design, whilst retaining and maintaining those which most broadly meet the aim of creating extra space for physical distancing.

Modal filter planters which were previously installed to prevent motor vehicle access have now been removed from the undernoted streets, along with any associated signage and road markings:

  • Ark Lane at Broompark Drive
  • Armadale Street at Craigpark Drive (northbound)
  • Craigpark at Craigpark Drive (northbound)
  • Craigpark at Onslow Drive (southbound)
  • Whitehill Street at Onslow Drive (southbound)

The recently introduced one-way systems and footway widening measures will be retained however at the locations below, ensuring more space for walking and wheeling around St Denis’ RC and Alexandra Parade Primary Schools and helping to ease congestion during the school run:

  • Armadale Street (between Duke Street and Roslea Drive) – northbound
  • Armadale Street (between Golfhill Drive and Alexandra Parade) – northbound
  • Meadowpark Street (between Finlay Drive and Roslea Drive) – southbound
  • Meadowpark Street at Ingleby Drive – northbound then westbound.

Full details of these short-term infrastructure changes have now been added to the Dennistoun Spaces for People webpage.

DCC: The response describes the process of downscaling the scheme. It does not explain why the original design opted not to remove through routes between Duke Street and Alexandra Parade.

The attached images show the many through routes that remained open with the full scheme in place (before various elements were removed). This is a significantly more permeable arrangement than what is generally understood to constitute a Low Traffic Neighbourhood, yet it is still being referred to as an LTN. This choice of description has led to a range of misunderstandings and frustrations being expressed and disseminated.

Through Routes Southbound
Through Routes Southbound
Through Routes Northbound
Through Routes Northbound

Why did the initial design and implementation leave multiple through routes open in both directions between Duke Street and Alexandra Parade?

DCC Q2: Temporary signage with poles in concrete blocks has been deemed sufficient in certain locations, so why have numerous new permanent signposts been installed elsewhere, for a scheme which is initially temporary and said to be easily changed in response to feedback?

GCC: The NAL temporary foundations have been used mainly at locations where road closure measures were in place meaning they are agile and can be readily adjusted to suit location variables should the need arise. New permanent sign poles have only been installed at locations where temporary infrastructure could not be used due to restrictions on the road / footway.

DCC: The quantity of permanent sign poles that were used, and the location they were used in, for a temporary scheme such as this, is not satisfactorily explained by simply citing undefined “restrictions on the road/footway”.

DCC Q3: The completion of the scheme and installation of missing no entry signage and markings. Why do the no entry points on Craigpark (at Craigpark Dr, and at Golfhill Dr), and on Armadale Street (at Craigpark Dr) have no entry signs on only one side of the road whilst other no entry points have signs on both sides of the road?

GCC: Signage installations were carried out dependent on site conditions and practicability.

DCC: It is not credible to simply cite “site conditions and practicability” for locations where no-entry signs on both sides of the road were not accommodated. This was a design decision made specifically for locations where the no-entry was half the carriageway width.

The result was very high levels of non-compliance: vehicles treated the planter arrangements at these locations as merely a chicane to be negotiated and exploited the ambiguity, with lawful driving immediately resumed at the other side of the planters. Drivers weren’t going through a no-entry point, they were merely going past one.

This is in contrast to no-entry points spanning the full carriageway width. E.g. the half-finished (one sign only) no-entry on Armadale Street at Roslea Drive, where the same high levels of non-compliance were in evidence despite the unavoidable 70 m length of one way road facing drivers opting to continue southward. But when the additional sign went up on the opposite side of the carriageway (along with supplementary road markings), compliance was massively improved.

The point being made here is that the designs for the half carriageway width no-entry points were of a deficient design. But rather than improve their implementation in an attempt to improve compliance, the option was taken to remove them altogether.

Why were the no-entry points on Criagpark and Armadale Street removed outright so soon after installation, with virtually no monitoring period during which the full scheme was in place, and without any attempt at improvement?

DCC Q4: What feedback has been received from emergency services?

GCC: Feedback was received from Police Scotland who raised concerns regarding the Contra-flow cycling proposals as well as concerns regarding the absence of further physical measures at some locations to discourage drivers from simply driving around the modal filter planters and ignoring ‘No Entry’ signage thus creating a significant enforcement burden.

DCC: As per Q3, DCC shared the concerns of the Police regarding the poorly designed no-entry points at modal filter planters. Why were improved no-entry points (with signs on both sides of the carriageway and no-entry road markings) not put in place?

It is exceedingly concerning, to say the least, that a legitimate traffic calming measure intended to create better safer streets right outside a primary school would be removed simply because of an anticipated additional “enforcement burden”.

Contraflow cycling is covered under Q5.

DCC Q5: Why has a Spaces for People active travel scheme ended up with less usable road space available to cycles – i.e. if a road was previously suitable for two-way mixed vehicular and cycle traffic, what specific additional risk was identified by having contraflow cycling permitted on a well-marked and signed vehicular one-way street (especially when it is within what is now being described as a low traffic neighbourhood and of identical geometry to vehicular two way roads which have no constraints on access to cycles)?

GCC: The contra-flow cycling element of the scheme was removed based on road widths and parked vehicles on both sides.

DCC: No specific additional risk has been identified. The issue of road widths and parked vehicles pre-exists on these roads with two-way traffic and it has not been explained how well-marked and signed one-way streets with contraflow cycling differ from this.

If a legitimate new risk arising from parked vehicles can in some way be identified, then it should be explained why an active travel scheme has been designed that preserves car parking spaces in preference to providing safe and direct cycle access.

In the current configuration, cycles are required to take longer and more circuitous routes than before the scheme was in place. This is unambiguously a downgrade to cycling provision.

Armadale Street to Whitevale Street
Armadale Street to Whitevale Street

By way of illustration, consider the route from Armadale Street southbound toward Gallowgate and London Road via Whitevale Street (see attached image) – i.e. along quiet cycle-friendly streets, rather than busy carriageways with four vehicular lanes and no cycle provision. This journey now requires a diversion east or west along the vehicular route, and then back along Duke Street, navigating the additional junctions along the way. Has the additional risk created by the extended route to bypass south Armadale Street been balanced against the alleged risk of the previously proposed contraflow cycling?

It is precisely these sorts of diversions (rather than actually removing through routes altogether) which formed the basis of the claim that this is or was in any way a Low Traffic Neighbourhood scheme. If they were supposed to be a discouragement to vehicles then, at the very least, the same principle can be applied to cycles. And that doesn’t take into account the inevitable likelihood of some cyclists, in the face of a route option taken away, just choosing from the non-compliant options of either using the one-way as a contraflow anyway, or taking a route along the pavement. Should the evident increased enforcement burden at south Armadale Street be used as justification for removing the new configuration at this location?

Staying with that route – at the crossroads junction of Armadale Street and Roslea Drive, three of the four arms approaching it have give way markings. Per highway code rule 170 and associated laws, southbound vehicles on Armadale Street are on what is logically the “main road” and therefore have priority over these three give ways. But when two or more vehicles are approaching this crossroads from the south/west/east at the same time (a frequent occurrence) there is no clear priority for one vehicle over another: none of them are on the “main road”. Another frustration, and risk, for cyclists especially, when trying to navigate the new extended route. Is the road marking layout at the crossroads of Armadale Street and Roslea Drive confirmed as being fully compliant with legislation, or has approval for a deviation been given? Who has priority when two or more vehicles simultaneously approach this crossroads from the south/west/east?

Outside of Alexandra Parade primary school, the cycle symbol road markings have been removed. Does north Armadale Street outside Alexandra Parade primary school still have a contraflow cycle lane? If yes, why remove the road markings? If no, why have the temporary ‘no left/right turn except cycles’ signs been left in place?

DCC Q6: Why has a scheme initially given a two week installation programme ended up with three months being the revised installation period?

GCC: I can advise that as you are already aware the Council first began works to implement the proposed Dennistoun LTN on Tuesday 08 December 2020. Unfortunately, delays with contractors and materials, available staff resources and the need for some modifications to the scheme based on feedback received meant works were not completed in full until mid-March.

DCC: Works have not been completed in full: pavement areas at the bases of new signposts have not been reinstated.

Beyond that, the cited reasons for delay were largely foreseeable and avoidable. The scheme being significantly unfinished for so long, without clear explanation being communicated, meant that trust and buy-in amongst the community (already tentative) was tested to breaking point. This has a potentially damaging effect on any attempt to introduce future traffic control measures in the area if steps are not taken to acknowledge and remedy the situation.

DCC Q7: The drawings circulated showed the removal of pedestrian barrier at Alexandra Parade primary school and appeared to show a build-out feature or marking realignment at the corner of Whitehill St and Duke St (outside Coia’s) – are these elements of the design still due to be implemented?

GCC: It had been our intention to remove the pedestrian safety barrier outside of Alexandra Parade Primary School to create more room for physical distancing following the installation of the modal filter planters. However due to safety concerns the barrier will remain.

I can confirm that no build-out feature was proposed for the Whitehill Street / Duke Street junction.

DCC: Referencing “safety concerns” without further detail does not provide any clarity. What are the safety concerns, specifically, in relation to the removal of pedestrian barrier outside Alexandra Parade primary school?

It is reasonable to presume that the basic risk identified is that the run of planters is permeable to pedestrians. This is a minor design issue that could easily be resolved to provide a much more usable pedestrian space. Why has it not been deemed practicable to provide safe pedestrian space outside of Alexandra Parade primary school without the need for a retained pedestrian barrier running down the middle of it?

The Whitehill Street/Duke Street junction is a location frequently identified as suffering from parking offences and junction visibility issues. Is there scope for a temporary build-out (as shown on the issued drawings) to be tried out at the Whitehill Street/Duke Street junction as part of this “agile” and “readily adjusted scheme” (see attached image)?

Whitehill Street Duke Street Build-out
Whitehill Street Duke Street Build-out

DCC Q8: What arrangements are in place for compliance monitoring and enforcement measures?

GCC: Police Scotland are responsible for compliance and the enforcement of moving traffic violations. The Council’s enforcement team are responsible for the enforcement of any parking restrictions i.e double yellow lines.

DCC: Parking restrictions are, without question, not being effectively enforced in Dennistoun – why is that?

DCC Q9: How are various factors contributing to success or failure being measured and determined?

GCC: All immediately affected roads, plus surrounding roads will be monitored and any feedback from the local community and local ward members will also be considered.

DCC: As noted in our correspondence dated 15th March, this set of questions should be taken as a composite of community feedback following on from a series of public meetings discussing the scheme and items of correspondence received from people keen to provide feedback without (at that time) no clear way to do so directly to GCC. Some of the basic fundamental questions arising have not been answered. Where amendments to the scheme have been made, clear explanations have not been provided.

What is the method of monitoring of this scheme, and will any quantitative data be published?

DCC Q10: What and when are the next steps for traffic safety and management, and active travel provision, in Dennistoun in the event of success/failure (e.g. removing/reducing/keeping and maintaining/enhancing/extending this scheme; introducing similar measures elsewhere in Dennistoun; introducing the 20 mph limit previously proposed by the RPZ, etc)?

GCC: These measures have been installed using a Temporary Traffic Regulation Order. Such orders can only stay in force for a maximum of 18 months while the effects are monitored and reviewed. If the Council wish to make such measures permanent then they would need to follow a statutory process which includes consultation where members of the public can comment, object or support the proposals.

Moving forward, and in line with the Council’s liveable neighbourhoods strategy, measures to encourage active travel will be included as part of future parking control proposals. This will also include a 20mph zone and will form part of a full consultation process.

DCC: The Council website update on this scheme notes that elements of the original plan have been removed “whilst retaining and maintaining those which most broadly meet the aim of creating extra space for physical distancing”. This is a long way short of fulfilling the Council’s liveable neighbourhoods strategy, encouraging active travel, addressing parking issues, and incorporating a 20 mph zone.

If a permanent scheme to achieve all the stated Council aims is to be completed before the 18 month period for the current temporary scheme ends, it seems reasonable to suggest that a timeline or programme detailing various milestones will have already been identified such that a design can be developed for Dennistoun, including consultation and engagement with the community at a level beyond the basic statutory process for a permanent Traffic Regulation Order – is that the case?

2021 Scottish Parliamentary Election Hustings – Glasgow Provan Constituency

Dennistoun Community Council - 2021 Scottish Parliamentary Election Hustings - Glasgow Provan Constituency
Dennistoun Community Council – 2021 Scottish Parliamentary Election Hustings – Glasgow Provan Constituency

A 2021 Scottish Parliamentary Election Hustings for the Glasgow Provan constituency will be hosted and chaired by Dennistoun Community Council on Thursday 22nd April 2021 starting at 7pm and finishing at 9pm, held online at facebook.com/DennistounCC.

Continue reading 2021 Scottish Parliamentary Election Hustings – Glasgow Provan Constituency

Sustainable Car Use

If you own a car that you don’t use every day, or you don’t own a car but would like access to one, a car club provides the option of affordable occasional access to a local vehicle.

Car club vehicles are cleaner than the average car (at 33% lower CO2 emissions per kilometre) without the hassles and expense of ownership (such as tax, MOT, insurance, fuel, servicing, repairs, depreciation and parking). If you drive less than 6,000 – 8,000 miles per year, a car club could save up to £3,500 a year.

As multiple users share one car and one parking space, parking pressures are much reduced, typically removing the need for more than 10 privately owned cars which would otherwise be stored on public roads while not in use.

Access to a vehicle without the upfront and fixed expense of ownership can also help tackle social exclusion and improve quality of life where the level car ownership is low, such as Glasgow, where fewer than half of households have access to a private car.

Continue reading Sustainable Car Use

Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ Scheme in Dennistoun

We write regarding the Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ scheme in Dennistoun and further to the Dennistoun Community Council (DCC) Statement on Traffic and Streetscape published on Monday 7th December 2020, which was sent to all Dennistoun and Calton Ward Councillors and Cllr Anna Richardson (as City Convener for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction).

This was followed-up with further discussion at the January and February DCC meetings, which were attended by local Councillors and are minuted here: dennistouncc.org.uk/minutes.

Our most recent DCC meeting, held on 9th March 2021, was attended by more than a dozen members of the public wishing to discuss the scheme. Additionally, approximately 30 items of correspondence have been recently received by DCC, expressing a broad range of sentiments on the scheme. Many residents are greatly concerned by the lack of clear communication from GCC. Notably, some common themes have emerged, regardless of whether sentiment is broadly for or against:

  • Better, safer, provision around schools is generally supported in principle;
  • Better, safer, active travel provision and public transport as a general principle are supported;
  • It is felt that the new no entries and one ways have rerouted traffic, for reasons that have not been clearly explained, to minimal or no obvious benefit at best, or to a clear detriment at worst;
  • Reasons for particular dissatisfaction or concern include: road safety issues created arising from non-compliance of vehicular traffic; increases in volumes of traffic on roads not suited to it; removal of contraflow cycling provision and overall available roadspace; noise concerns; and potential pollution and air quality issues arising if traffic levels are not sufficiently reduced as a counter to the longer through routes created.

DCC therefore seeks answers to the following questions:

Continue reading Spaces for People ‘Low Traffic Neighbourhood’ Scheme in Dennistoun

Meeting Minutes: 9th February 2021

Approved minutes of the Dennistoun Community Council ordinary meeting held on Tuesday 9th February are now available at dennistouncc.org.uk/minutes.

Minutes of the meeting held on 9th March are to be approved at the next ordinary meeting, in May. It is intended that an update note will be published shortly, summarising the discussion held about the recently introduced traffic measures.

Dates and details of future meetings can be found at dennistouncc.org.uk/dates. The next ordinary meeting will take place on Tuesday 11th May 2021, from 7:00pm online, via Zoom.

To get DCC updates delivered to your inbox, enter your email address into the box in the menu section of this site and click Subscribe Now! (To the left of the screen in desktop view, or via the menu button at the top of the screen in mobile view). Easy to unsubscribe from at any time.

Next Meeting: 9th March 2021

You are warmly invited to attend the next ordinary meeting of Dennistoun Community Council, which will take place on Tuesday 9th March 2021 from 7pm online via Zoom.

The agenda is available here. Time will be allocated for general public input. Approved minutes from past meetings can be viewed here.

If you would like to attend the meeting on Zoom, please email hello@dennistouncc.org.uk to register your interest, and you will be sent details of how to join in shortly before the meeting starts.

If you are unable to join us on Zoom, you can still submit questions for discussion, also to hello@dennistouncc.org.uk.

To get DCC updates delivered to your inbox, enter your email address into the box in the menu section of this site and click Subscribe Now! (To the left of the screen in desktop view, or via the menu button at the top of the screen in mobile view). Easy to unsubscribe from at any time.